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Thanksgiving with the Lemurs

Thanksgiving with the Lemurs

 

lemurs all together

 

 

Join us on Thanksgiving day and come see the lemurs as they enjoy their thanksgiving in style. The lemurs will have a traditonal thanksgiving feast and eat on a table  “The lemurs feasted on a menu of turkey made of browse biscuits, sweet potato pie with a browse biscuit crust and popcorn, green beans, sugar-free grape jelly with dried cranberries, and sugar-free grape juice,”

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Santa with the Animals

 

 

Santa brings presents to the animal residents here at Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary! Join Santa on Sunday, December 10, 2017, from 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm, as he roams the park handing out gifts and treats to our very deserving animal residents. Earlier that day you can stop by the Event Center Lawn and help decorate the boxes that he'll be giving out. And later that day, Santa will also be available to meet with children, hear their holiday wishes, and pose for pictures. For more information, please call us at 928.778.4242.

 

Santa with bunnies

 

 

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ZooLittles Preschool Program

ZooLittles Logo
COME PLAY IN THE DIRT! ZooLittles is an exciting and dynamic program designed for pre-schoolers (age 3 - 5) to help develop young children's’ physical, emotional, and intellectual growth through exciting hands-on experiences. This includes working in the zoo’s organic garden to understand soil, plant, and insect relationships. Children participate in worm composting & understanding its role in soil development; they will also interact with zoo animals, feed them, and learn about their many different varieties, environments, and relationships. Group interaction in simulated and real environments will be promoted and encouraged with guided activities and free play time.

Vision: Creating opportunities for children to gain appreciation for and become stewards of the natural world.

 
This program will be held on varying Wednesdays and Saturdays from May through September, 9:30 am - 11:30 am. The full listing of dates is as follows: May 6, 10, 17, 20, 24, 31  •  June 3, 7, 14, 17, 21, 28  •  July 1, 5, 12, 15, 19, 26  •  August 2, 5, 9, 16, 19, 23, 30  •  September 2, 6, 13, 16, 20, 27
 
Pricing for this two-hour program (per class) is $10 for members (per child with one accompanying adult) and $15 for Non-Members (per child with one accompanying adult). We also have discounts available to those who register for multiple sessions. For every four classes you register for, you can save $5. For members, instead of $40 for four classes, you'd pay just $35.
 
The registration form can be found here. Pre-registration is required and spaces are limited.

Mission: Inspire children to appreciate the natural world through physical interaction and experiential learning.

 
ZooLittles 3 ZooLittles 1 zoolittles 23123 ZooLittles 1
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Behind-the-Scenes Photography Tour

photographic tour experience - dartmoor zoo

Event Dates: Saturday, April 22, 2017 & Saturday, November 18, 2017
Event Time: 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Price: Members: $25, Non-Members: $30

Do you think you have an eye for photography? Do you wish you could get special access to the grounds and with the animals for photos? If so, this Photography Tour is just the thing for you! In the morning, an hour before the park opens, bring your best camera and get some amazing behind-the-scenes photos of the Sanctuary that you wouldn't be able to get otherwise!

On these dates, we'll tour the zoo for a special look at some of your favorite animals we have here at the sanctuary. You'll also be guided by our Animal Keepers, who will be able to provide special access for photos that you cannot get when the park is open. We'll bring animals out when we can, allow you into enclosures we're able, and let you beyond the barriers when it's acceptable. Some animals we cannot provide special access, but for many, you'll be able to get some shots you'd never be able to get otherwise.

The event will begin at 9:00am, and officially run until 10:30am, a half-hour after the park opens to the public. Coffee and tea will be provided for guests. Mornings provide great sunlight for photos, and it's a time when many of our animals are out and about. This start time will also provide attendees with an hour of unfettered access before the general public arrives. After the event, attendees are welcome to self tour the park (with regular access) at their leisure.

Pre-Registration is required and space will be extremely limited (we can only allow special access to so many people). Last year was our first attempt at this event, and even though we have some plans to make this year's installment better, it was still a great hit and sold out quickly. For more information on this event or to register (or to inquire when registration opens), please contact Lorette at 928.778.4242, ext. 16.

FAQ    For information on our private tours, click here.

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Amazon Smile


Directions to Support Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary via AmazonSmile

AmazonSmile is a great way to support your favorite charity, all while doing the same shopping on Amazon that you already do anyway. By linking your Amazon account to Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary, Amazon will donate a small percentage of your purchases back to our sanctuary. We do not receive or have access to any of your personal or purchasing information; all donations are anonymous.

To link your account, follow the easy steps below. Once you're linked, just make sure to do all of your future shopping through Smile.Amazon.com and your preferences will be saved. It's all of the same products and same prices, just for a good cause!

AmazonSmile-logo

  • There you'll be prompted to sign in to your account.
  • After you sign-in, it will ask you to select your charity.

  • Where it says “Or pick your own charitable organization:” at the bottom, enter “Heritage Park Zoo” and hit enter.

  • Select the listing that says "Prescott Animal Parks Association" (in Prescott, AZ).

  • Once you've selected our organization, Amazon will remember your preference and you will not need to go through this process again.

  • That's it! Now, just shop and Amazon will do the rest. The more you shop, the more your help our organization!

 

Thank you for continuing to help support our animal, resucue and education programs. Your donations to our community organization truly make a huge difference - we could not do all that we do without your support.

For questions about this program, please feel free to call Alex at 928.778.4242, ext. 16

Program and Outreach Classes

  • wilson

    What is alive?

    In this come to you program, a few animals and a few "look-a-like" items (ex: tortoise & a rock) will visit the classroom and the students will have to distinguish why one is alive and the other is not.

    Body parts and senses

    Either here at the Zoo or in your classroom, have a mammal visit with the students and have them identify the animal's senses by looking at the body parts. They will practice sniffing out food like a Turkey Vulture, listening like a bat who navigates by sound, seeing like an owl, and touching like a raccoon. Numbers can also be incorporated (ex: the rabbit has one nose, two ears, four legs, etc.)

    Arizona Animals

    Students will learn about Arizona animals by meeting some up close!


  • Animal Differences

    Students will learn about the differences between animals such as mammals, reptiles, birds and insects. They will investigate the ways they move and the different coverings they have for protection by observing a variety of animals and animal pelts.

    Arizona Animals

    Students will learn about Arizona animals and plants by seeing some up close! They will compare different plants and animals and learn what native animals eat.


  • snakeBody parts and senses

    Students will compare a variety of animals and see why they are different. They will also learn what different animal body parts are for and what senses are strongest on different animals. They will practice sniffing out food like a Turkey Vulture, listening like a bat who navigates by sound, seeing like an owl, and touching like a raccoon.

    Creepy Crawlies

    Students will explore animals that most people don't like and why they don't like them. We will meet some of these interesting critters while dispelling myths and learning more about them.

    Mammals

    Students will meet different mammals and learn to tell them apart. They will investigate what characteristics are unique to mammals.

    Life Cycles

    Students will learn compare different animals such as mammals, birds, reptiles and insects and learn about their varied life cycles.


  • Web of Life

    Students will learn about how animals, plants and the environment are all interconnected. They will investigate how removing something or adding something to the environment can affect all the members of that ecosystem.

    Animal Adaptations

    Students will learn about the different ways animals are adapted for their environments and seasonal changes. They will investigate the differences between warm blooded and cold blooded animals, look at animals that live in trees and how they are different from animals that live on the ground and find out which animals hibernate for the winter and why.



  • cockroach
    Animal Anatomy

    How are rabbits different from snakes? Students will explore different anatomical structures in different animals by observing live animals as well as animal skulls.

    Animal Differences

    What makes a reptile a reptile and a mammal a mammal? Students will learn about the differences between reptiles, mammals, birds and insects and how to tell them apart by observing a variety of live animals, animal pelts and skins.


  • Animal Anatomy

    Students will compare an animal's skeleton to that of a human. They will also learn how muscles work in different ways in different animals by observing a variety of live animals and animal skeletons.


  • Animal Anatomy

    Why do rabbits have such long legs? How do their bodies process eating only plants? Learn about different anatomical structures and physiological processes of a variety of animals and how their different systems function by observing live animals and animal skulls.


  • Lemur
    Common, Endangered and Extinct

    With this program, students will get an in-depth look at what causes extinction, what can be done to prevent it, and the actions that are already being taken to preserve wildlife. Along with a close look at Endangered native species, students will also learn about animals that used to live in Arizona, and find out why they no longer live here.

    Animal Anatomy

    Why do some tortoises have spurs on their legs? How do herbivores process food compared to carnivores? Why do amphibians have such slimy skin? Why are the feet of a raccoon so different from those of a fox? Learn about different anatomical structures and physiological processes of a variety of animals and how their different systems function by observing live animals and animal skulls and skins.


  • Animal Behavior

    In this program, students will learn which animals hibernate and which animals migrate and why. They will also learn how animals who don’t use these behaviors survive the winter. They will be able to identify the difference between evergreen and deciduous plants and trees and learn about different animals and their behaviors, why they developed those behaviors and how they benefit from them in the wild.

    Animal Adaptations

    Students will learn about the different ways animals and plants are adapted for their environments and niches. They will investigate the differences between warm blooded and cold blooded animals and investigate relationships between different organisms. They find out why some animals have bright colors and what those mean to predators. They will also examine different birds and how their diet affects the size and shape of their beaks.


  • Conservation Action

    Discuss what it means to be a citizen and how the sanctuary acts as a group of active citizens. Learn about our animals' natural and individual histories focusing on the cause of their captivity and the various conservation issues the sanctuary addresses. Learn to recognize multiple sides to issues and how people can positively make differences.

  • Pick-a-theme

    If your group is studying something specific or is interested in a unique program not described above, we would be happy to work with you to develop a custom presentation perfect for you. Please contact the Education Department at (928) 778-4242 ext 18 for more information.

Tours

  • Body parts and senses

    Either here at the Zoo or in your classroom, have a mammal visit with the students and have them identify the animal's senses by looking at the body parts. They will practice sniffing out food like a Turkey Vulture, listening like a bat who navigates by sound, seeing like an owl, and touching like a raccoon. Numbers can also be incorporated (ex: the rabbit has one nose, two ears, four legs, etc.)

    What Animals Need to Live

    Students will tour the Zoo and learn all about what animals need to survive by investigating what they eat, how much they drink and how much space they need.

    AZ Animals

    Students will learn about Arizona animals by meeting some up close!

     

  • Animal Differences

    Students will learn about the differences between animals such as mammals, reptiles, birds and insects. They will investigate the ways they move and the different coverings they have for protection by observing a variety of animals and animal pelts.

    AZ Animals

    Students will learn about Arizona animals and plants by seeing some up close! They will compare different plants and animals and learn what native animals eat.

     

  • Body parts and senses

    Students will compare a variety of animals and see why they are different. They will also learn what different animal body parts are for and what senses are strongest on different animals. They will practice sniffing out food like a Turkey Vulture, listening like a bat who navigates by sound, seeing like an owl, and touching like a raccoon.

    Creepy Crawlies

    Students will explore animals that most people don't like and why they don't like them. We will meet some of these interesting critters while dispelling myths and learning more about them.

    Mammals

    Students will meet different mammals and learn to tell them apart. They will investigate what characteristics are unique to mammals.

    Life Cycles

    Students will learn compare different animals such as mammals, birds, reptiles and insects and learn about their varied life cycles.

  • Animals and Their Environment

    Students will explore different animals and the environment in which they live. There will also be an examination of the environment of Prescott, which includes a trip down to Willow Lake to look at the ecosystem there.

    Web of Life

    Students will learn about how animals, plants and the environment are all interconnected. They will investigate how removing something or adding something to the environment can affect all the members of that ecosystem.

    Animal Adaptations

    Students will learn about the different ways animals are adapted for their environments and seasonal changes. They will investigate the differences between warm blooded and cold blooded animals, look at animals that live in trees and how they are different from animals that live on the ground and find out which animals hibernate for the winter and why.

    Common, Endangered and Extinct

    With the Zoo's multitude of animals, we have many that are endangered, threatened and common. With this program, students will get an in-depth look at what causes extinction, what can be done to prevent it, and the actions that are already being taken to preserve wildlife.

  • Animal Anatomy

    How are rabbits different from snakes? Students will explore different anatomical structures in different animals by observing live animals as well as animal skulls.

    Animal Differences

    What makes a reptile a reptile and a mammal a mammal? Students will learn about the differences between reptiles, mammals, birds and insects and how to tell them apart by observing a variety of live animals, animal pelts and skins.

    Common, Endangered and Extinct

    With the Zoo's multitude of animals, we have many that are endangered, threatened and common. With this program, students will get an in-depth look at what causes extinction, what can be done to prevent it, and the actions that are already being taken to preserve wildlife. A special focus will be paid to Mexican Grey Wolves and the Species Survival Plan.

    Animal Adaptations

    Learn about the different ways animals and plants are adapted for their environments and seasonal changes. Investigate the differences between warm blooded and cold blooded animals and look at animals that live in trees and how they are different from animals that live on the ground. Find out which animals hibernate for the winter and why. Learn to identify the difference between evergreen and deciduous trees and plants and investigate how plants survive in the desert.

  • Animal Anatomy

    Students will compare an animal's skeleton to that of a human. They will also learn how muscles work in different ways in different animals by observing a variety of live animals and animal skeletons.

  • Aquatic Discovery

    What lives in a lake? How can you determine if the lake is healthy? In this class, we will investigate these questions and look at some animals that live in or near the water. This unique and exciting experience allows students to strap on waders and get into Willow Lake for an afternoon of discovery and fun.

    Animal Anatomy

    Why do rabbits have such long legs? How do their bodies process eating only plants? Learn about different anatomical structures and physiological processes of a variety of animals and how their different systems function by observing live animals and animal skulls.

    Common, Endangered and Extinct

    With the Zoo's multitude of animals, we have plenty that are endangered, threatened and common. With this program, students will get an in-depth look at what causes extinction, what can be done to prevent it, and the actions that are already being taken to preserve wildlife. Along with a close look at the Endangered Mexican Grey Wolves and Tortoises at the Zoo, students will also learn about animals that used to live in Arizona, and find out why they no longer live here.

    Animals and Their Environment

    What is the weather like today and how is that affecting what the animals are doing? Students start this program by taking measurements of the current temperature and weather conditions. They will then observe what the animals are doing and draw conclusions about how the weather affects their behavior. The tour will conclude with a trip down to Willow Lake to look at the ecosystem there.

  • Predators and Prey

    Learn about the differences between predators and prey, how they are vital to the food web and a healthy ecosystem. This tour also includes a game that looks at what animals have been introduced into Arizona and how those animals are affecting the food web and the niches of the animals native to the state.

    Animals and Their Environment

    How many animals can fit in an enclosure? How is this number determined? How does this translate to ecosystems outside the sanctuary? Students will learn about limiting factors and carrying capacity by learning about how animals are taken care of at the sanctuary and through a trip down to Willow Lake to look at the ecosystem there. Students will observe what animals and plants live at the lake and learn about how they interact.

    Common, Endangered and Extinct

    With the Zoo's multitude of animals, we have many that are endangered, threatened and common. With this program, students will get an in-depth look at what causes extinction, what can be done to prevent it, and the actions that are already being taken to preserve wildlife. Along with a close look at the Endangered Mexican Grey Wolves and Tortoises at the Zoo, students will also learn about animals that used to live in Arizona, and find out why they no longer live here.

    Animal Anatomy

    Why do some tortoises have spurs on their legs? How do herbivores process food compared to carnivores? Why do amphibians have such slimy skin? Why are the feet of a raccoon so different from those of a fox? Learn about different anatomical structures and physiological processes of a variety of animals and how their different systems function by observing live animals and animal skulls and skins.

  • Animal Behavior

    In this program, students will learn which animals hibernate and which animals migrate and why. They will also learn how animals who don't use these behaviors survive the winter. They will be able to identify the difference between evergreen and deciduous plants and trees and learn about different animals and their behaviors, why they developed those behaviors and how they benefit from them in the wild.

    Animal Adaptations

    Students will learn about the different ways animals and plants are adapted for their environments and niches. They will investigate the differences between warm blooded and cold blooded animals and investigate relationships between different organisms. They find out why some animals have bright colors and what those mean to predators. They will also examine different birds and how their diet affects the size and shape of their beaks.

  • Conservation Action

    Discuss what it means to be a citizen and how the sanctuary acts as a group of active citizens. Learn about our animals' natural and individual histories focusing on the cause of their captivity and the various conservation issues the sanctuary addresses. Learn to recognize multiple sides to issues and how people can positively make differences.

  • Pick-A-theme

    If your group is studying something specific or is interested in a unique program not described above, we would be happy to work with you to develop a custom presentation perfect for you.  We can also add any in-classroom program to your tour for an additional fee.  Please contact the Education Department at (928) 778-4242 ext 18 for more information.